INTERPRETING YOUR RESULTS

 

By now you will have added up the score for each of the twenty-one questions. The highest possible total for the whole test would be sixty-three. This would mean you chose number three on all twenty-one questions. 

1-10 These ups and downs are considered normal.

It's possible that you are reading this out of curiosity because you may have noticed that lately you are less interested in things, you are more tired than usual (not unusual for a pilot of course), maybe your appetite is a “bit off” and perhaps you’re drinking a bit more when you’re off duty.  You know this isn’t helping and now is the time to take stock.  Commit to some small changes for the next month then return to this site for another look.

11-16   Mild Mood disturbance 

If your score is about here, then this is when some early action could make a real difference.  You may be beginning to cut yourself off a bit, perhaps there have been some changes in your life - positive or negative (relationship changes, Sim assessment, Captaincy) and there may be some subtle changes in the way you are thinking about things. Talking to someone will help; maybe a trusted colleague who understands the rigours of aviation life, or a professional who can judge whether you would benefit from psychological therapy (non-medication).   This would help you improve your problem solving skills and challenge your thinking style. 

Go to our resources section and look at some of the exercises. These give a flavour of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT).

 

17-20  Borderline Clinical Depression

If your score falls here, this suggests that your mood has been affected for some time and that symptoms are becoming more severe. Unless you are making efforts to mask things, close family members or friends may have already noticed changes in your behaviour.  At this stage a you would be best to consult your GP.  If you were a non-pilot, you would likely be prescribed a mild anti-depressant and possibly be referred for some form of CBT.  The licence implications of this are obvious, however, your GP may decide your symptoms may still improve without the need for medication.

 

21-30   Moderate depression 

Scores at this level and above suggest that your symptoms are having a significant impact on your everyday living and working.  Colleagues you fly with may find you irritable or aloof. You will be withdrawing from normal social interactions and your physical health will be suffering.  Consulting your GP will ensure you receive the help you need.  At this point your fitness to fly is very likely to be impaired.  

 

31-40   Severe depression

Please be reassured that you are not alone, what you are experiencing is more common than you might realise and that help is at hand from a variety of sources.

40+      Extreme depression

Please be reassured that you are not alone, what you are experiencing is more common than you might realise and that help is at hand from a variety of sources.

 

 

 

Interpreting the results of the BDI -
Beck Depression Inventory. 

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